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How can an extra $100 boost your mortgage?

Extra Payment Image, March 2018

When it comes to mortgages, $100 isn’t going to get you very far. But what if you paid an extra $100 a month towards your mortgage? It’s not a lot of money these days, but it can add up to some solid savings over time.

Let’s look at a $300,000 mortgage with a 2.89% rate and a 25-year amortization. At the end of five years, you’ve paid off an extra $6,444. The balance owing is $249,435. And the remaining amortization is 17 years and 9 months instead of 20 years.  This also represents an interest savings of $11,423 over the life of the mortgage. Not bad!

Now let’s look at paying an extra $200 per month. At the end of five years, you’ve paid off an extra $12,888. The balance owing is $242,991. And the remaining amortization is 15 years and 11 months. This represents an interest savings of $20,708 over the life of the mortgage! Continue reading “How can an extra $100 boost your mortgage?”

Debt diversification vs Debt consolidation…who wins?

debt

ONLY IN CANADA

Attention:  Bankers, close your ears.. we don’t want you to hear this.  Credit card balances, lines of credit, car loan, student loan, home reno loan, personal loan..   If you have one or more of these and you own a home, you’re probably losing money by paying a higher interest rate.  In many cases, $thousands are lost and overpaid each year.   And your Banker is laughing and recording Record profits!!

It’s surprising how many of us have some, or all of these debts… and ALSO a house with lots of equity.  Yet, as Canadians, we somehow think it’s better to separate our mortgage from other debts.  We somehow think it’s good to pay down our mortgage but then rack up other debts.  This attitude has puzzled me for years.

check out this chart for one client.. tell me if this looks familiar: Continue reading “Debt diversification vs Debt consolidation…who wins?”

Mortgage brief…Is it worth changing your mortgage today?

Fixed rate mortgageMortgage rates have never been lower.  Should you break your current mortgage to take advantage of the lower rates?   The answer is ‘yes’ and ‘no’.

YES….if the penalty to break your mortgage is less than the potential savings.  We are seeing many opportunities today where it PAYS to break your mortgage and get into today’s lower rates.

EXAMPLE for one client..  Existing mortgage is $275,000.  The existing rate is 2.99% with 3 years to go.  The penalty to exit is $3500.  The current 3 year rate is 2.24%.  Gross savings is $5602.  Net savings is $2102.

NO… if the penalty to break your mortgage is less than the potential savings.   EXAMPLE..  Penalty is $6500 and Gross savings is $5602.  Net loss is $898.

YES… if you think interest rates are going to be much higher in the next few years, you may still want to bite the bullet, pay the penalty and lock into a longer term fixed rate mortgage.   Everyone is different and has different needs, risk tolerances, plans.  This is a personal choice.

I’ve seen examples of both situations.  You could save money by breaking your mortgage.  The best advice is to speak with an experienced Mortgage Broker. Get an UNBIASED opinion.

Your best interest is my only interest.   I reply to all questions and I welcome your comments.  Like this article?  Share with a friend.

Steve Garganis 416 224 0114 steve@mortgagenow.ca

 

What can $100 do when it comes to a mortgage?

No Mortgage When it comes to mortgages, $100 isn’t gonna get your very far.   But what if you paid an extra $100/mth towards your mortgage?  It’s not a lot of money these days but it can add up to some good savings.

We looked at a $300,000 mortgage with a 2.89% rate and a 25 year amortization. At the end of 5 years, the borrower had paid off an extra $6,444.   The balance owing was $249,435.   And their remaining amortization was 17 years and 9 months instead of 20 years.  This also represented an interest savings of $11,423 over the life of the mortgage.  Not bad.

Now let’s look at paying an extra $200 per month.  At the end of 5 years, the borrower had paid off an extra $12,888 . The balance owing was $242,991.  And their remaining amortization was 15 years and 11 months.  This represented an interest savings of $20,708 over the life of the mortgage. Continue reading “What can $100 do when it comes to a mortgage?”

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