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BIG SIX BANKS exposed and called out by Financial Consumer Agency of Canada!

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The BIG SIX BANKS have been caught. For those who still think the banker is your friend and is only looking out for your best interests, guess again. They’re in the business of selling and making money. The FCAC has finally reported what Financial Experts have known for years!

This report was recently released… but I wonder how soon it will be forgotten? And how much media attention will this important story really get?

Don’t forget, the BIG SIX BANKS are among the Top 10 Largest and most profitable corporations in Canada. They spend billions in marketing each year. That sort of advertising budget can make us forget about these types of announcements.

Continue reading “BIG SIX BANKS exposed and called out by Financial Consumer Agency of Canada!”

Review your mortgage NOW! Next year may be too late.

It’s begun.  The message is starting to sink in.  The new mortgage rules could eliminate 15% of Canadians from qualifying for a mortgage after January 1st, 2018.  The mad rush has started as mortgage inquiries are up significantly.

WHO WILL BE AFFECTED?

  • Anyone that has a mortgage renewal in next 12 to 20 months.
  • Anyone thinking of buying in the next 12 months.
  • Anyone that is needs or is thinking of refinancing their mortgage in the next 12 months.
  • Rental property owners.  Yes, you too.
  • Future retirees with lots of home equity (newsflash..the new rules don’t take into consideration how much equity you have in your home.. your net worth is also irrelevant… it’s all about how much income you earn and declare…)

All of these borrowers will be affected.  If you’re not getting the message, anyone with a mortgage should be getting a review done NOW.  Don’t wait until next year.  You may not qualify for a mortgage.

EXPECT HOME SALES TO SPIKE UP TEMPORARILY Continue reading “Review your mortgage NOW! Next year may be too late.”

OSFI announces strictest mortgage rules ever… what you need to know.

HARDER TO QUALIFY WITH 50% DOWN THAN WITH 5% DOWN.. DOES THIS MAKE SENSE?

October 2016, our Federal govt announced a number of new mortgage rules including the infamous new ‘stress test’ for all insured mortgages.  Mortgage default insurance is required for all mortgages greater than 80% loan to value.  You have to qualify at the bank posted 5 yr fixed rate, which is usually around 1.75% to 2.00% higher than your actual rate, and with a maximum amortization of 25 yrs max.

These ‘rules’ were brought in last year to protect us from ourselves.   To ensure we could handle any large interest rate hikes at renewal time.  Sort of like big brother watching over us to make sure we don’t borrow more than we can afford. (btw, we already had lending rules in Canada.  Our mortgage arrears were and still are at record low levels.   Seems like our Banks, credit unions and other lenders are doing a pretty good job of lending.  Is more govt intervention necessary?  Most experts say no.)

Today, Jeremy Rudin, OSFI Superintendent, joined the party…. well, more like rained all over ever Canadian homeowner’s party (current and future).   OSFI, not wanting to be left out, announced they would impose more mortgage rule tightening for all mortgages that were UNDER 80% loan to value.    Again, to protect us from ourselves just in case interest rates should sky rocket at your renewal time.   Here’s a summary of the changes and how they will impact consumers, homeowners, and the real estate market:

  • A new minimum qualifying rate for uninsured mortgages.  The ‘stress test rate’ will be your contract rate + 2.00% or the 5 yr posted fixed rate, whichever is greater.(that’s right, your may have to qualify at a higher rate than those with insured mortgages above 80% loan to value.. how does that make sense?)
  • Federally regulated financial institutions must establish and adhere to appropriate Loan to value limits that are reflective of risk and updated as housing markets and the economic environment evolve (yeah, I’m not quite sure what this one means either.. stay tuned)
  • Federally regulated financial institutions are prohibited from arranging with another lender a mortgage, or combination of a mortgage and other lending products, in any form that circumvents the institution’s maximum Loan to value ratio or other limits in its residential mortgage underwriting policy. (this has dire consequences for those that won’t meet this historic new ‘stress test’.. effectively, the govt is telling you to not buy a home if you don’t fit in this new shrinking qualifying box…. or sell your home if you need to access the equity..)

 

HOW THIS AFFECTS YOU

  • buying with less than 20% down payment, no effect.  You already have a ‘stress test’.
  • buying with more than 20% down and you’ll have to pass a tougher test, that’s right, a tougher test than those with less than 20% down.  (Make any sense to you?  me neither.)
  • around another 15% of homeowners will NO longer qualify for a mortgage regardless of it being a purchase or if you wanted to refinance.
  • expect rental, condos or houses to become way more expensive as demand will spike.
  • we’ll see a spike in real estate sales from now until Jan 1st as homebuyers will scramble to get in prior to the new rules taking effect.
  • most credit unions are provincially regulated and for now, won’t be affected..  (that could change if the provinces amend their rules)

 

POSSIBLE SOLUTION TO DISCOURAGE HOME SPECULATORS BUT ENCOURAGE HOME OWNERSHIP

If you want to discourage speculators, make them hold the property for 5 or 7 years.  Bring in a declining speculation tax for anyone that sells a non-owner occupied home in less  than 5 years.  Reward those that hold real estate for longer periods.  You’ll have less transactions.  Encouraging longer holding times, more rental units on the market and higher vacancies.  More rental supply will also resolve high rents.  Bring back more realistic mortgage qualifying guidelines.  Encourage and promote buying investment properties.

A year ago, the Federal govt made several rule changes that effectively made it more expensive and difficult for consumers to borrow.  The list of changes was so long that most Canadians didn’t bother to react because it didn’t affect them that day.  But as we are seeing now, more consumers are experiencing reduced access to mortgage money.   They can’t refinance their mortgage.  They can’t draw on their built up equity in their homes.  It’s only when you need to borrow do you realize the extent of the changes.  Each and every one of us will be impacted.   These new policies will only make home ownership more difficult.  It will also slow our economy.

Perhaps the credit unions can pick up the slack and help …  stay tuned.. there will be more to share on these changes.     One thing is for certain.  You need to speak with an experienced Mortgage broker to understand what your options are.  It’s almost impossible to go it alone.. and you don’t have to.  Mortgage Brokers work for you, not the Bank.  They have access to dozens of competing lenders.

Your best interest is my only interest.   I reply to all questions and I welcome your comments.  Like this article?  Share with a friend.

Steve Garganis 416 224 0114 steve@mortgagenow.ca

Poloz in, Carney out as Bank of Canada Governor…3 major changes in less than a year!! Anyone else find this strange??!.

Poloz, Carney, Flaherty Stephen Poloz was announced as Mark Carney’s replacement as the new Bank of Canada Governor.  The announcement was a surprise for many… Most thought the Deputy Governor, Tiff Macklem, would have been a more likely candidate.  But Jim Flaherty, Minister of Finance, chose Poloz…. probably because he shares the same vision as Flaherty…  tighter lending rules, higher rates.. etc..

But this article isn’t about why Poloz is in, and Macklem is out.   I want to bring something else to your attention.   Did you know that we have had 3 major changes in less than 6 months?   Mark Carney is leaving Canada to head the Bank of England.   Then, within 6 months, the head of OSFI, Julie Dickson, announced she will be leaving in 2014.   And now Karen Kinsley, CEO of CMHC, has announced she is stepping down.  I’ll add in a fourth.. Robert P. Kelly has come in as Chairperson of CMHC… You’ll need to read this to understand why this is relevant.

These are major changes folks.  OSFI, CMHC and the Bank of Canada Governor.   3 major players that run and regulate Canada’s Financial and Banking sectors.  Has anyone asked why  they are all leaving now? Continue reading “Poloz in, Carney out as Bank of Canada Governor…3 major changes in less than a year!! Anyone else find this strange??!.”

CMHC CEO Karen Kinsley out, Wall Street banker Robert Kelly in… anybody asking why??

Karen Kinsley Karen Kinsley has been with CMHC (Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation) for 25 years.  The last 10 as it’s CEO.  CMHC makes buying a home more affordable by insuring the mortgage against default.  End result is a lower down payment requirement and lower interest rates.   CMHC is profitable.  They earned $1.7 billion in 2012 and $17 billion over the last 10 years.

In 2012, the Federal govt and the Minister of Finance decided to move CMHC under OSFI (Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions).   OSFI is a regulatory body that provides regulation and supervision to 152 Banks, Trust companies and other Lenders.   They function like auditors.  A move questioned by many and one that contradicts the spirit of what CMHC is supposed to stand for.

Enter Robert P. Kelly.  Mr. Kelly was appointed as Chairperson of the Board of Directors of CMHC this same month.  Coincidence?  Here’s a bit of history on Robert KellyKelly….He worked at TD Bank from 1981 to 2000 leaving as a senior executive that was on the short list to be TD’s CEO.. he didn’t get the job and left for the U.S. to join Wachovia, then later Bank of New York Mellon as CEO and Chairman.  I remember Mr. Kelly from my days working at TD.  He was always a higher profile, more visible executive…  Continue reading “CMHC CEO Karen Kinsley out, Wall Street banker Robert Kelly in… anybody asking why??”

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