Mortgage renewal opportunities missed.

Banksters

DON’T SIGN THAT RENEWAL AGREEMENT BEFORE SPEAKING WITH YOUR BROKER!

Summer is a great time.  Vacations, time off, no school, sun and fun.  It’s also a time when most of our mortgages come up for renewal.   This year, things are a little different.  The loooong winter is really making us cherish the precious few months of summer.   We want to soak up as much of this warmer weather as possible.

This relaxed mindset appears to be making us easier prey for the BANKS mortgage renewal departments.  Mortgage renewals will typically follow the same process.   You get a renewal offer anywhere from 120 to 30 days prior to maturity.   The BANKS will offer you a rate that may be lower than their posted rate but, it’s much higher than the market rate, and some of us will go back and negotiate, some will call a mortgage broker to get unbiased and true market rates, and some of us will just sign that renewal and send it back in.

In the old days, most of us would just sign and return that renewal to our BANKS.   But that trend started to change over the last 10 years.  Consumers were shopping, calling mortgage brokers and seeking out better products.   Until this summer…. Read the rest of this entry »

The Star article on private lenders

Some comments I made about the changing lending landscape.  Click on the link below. The article was good and shed some light on just how much the federal government has tightened the Mortgage rules in Canada.  But the article excluded one very important fact.

Yes, I agree that the govt has gone overboard with their rule changes, and has forced qualified mortgage borrowers to pay higher rates and fees by having to go to alternative lenders.  But, consumers don’t necessarily have to go from an “A” lender with the best rates (currently at around 3.00%),  to a “C” lender with rates of around 12% to 15%.

There are “B” lenders that offer mortgages with only slightly higher rates. Usually 1% to 2% higher than “A” lenders.   I think it’s important to point this out.  

A recent example is where one client was self employed, had a slightly bruised credit score of 602 (a good score is between 680 and 720), and his net income was not high enough to qualify (remember, self employed show a lower net income because they can write off more expenses). We found this client an 80% loan to value mortgage at 4.00% with some fees.   His net annual rate was 4.25%.  

Private lenders step into Mortgage void left by banks.

Your best interest is my only interest.   I reply to all questions and I welcome your comments.  Like this article?  Share with a friend.

Steve Garganis 416 224 0114 steve@mortgagenow.ca

Use your mortgage to pull debt together and save for retirement.

saving-for-retirementPerhaps too much debt has made your monthly cash flow tight, putting you under some financial pressure and making it almost impossible to save for retirement. With the right plan in place, it may be possible to simplify your debt, reduce interest costs, and save for retirement, all without earning more or cutting your spending. 

If you have enough equity in your home (you can’t refinance a mortgage above an 80 per cent loan to value), we can show you how to use that equity to roll your high-interest debt into a low-rate mortgage and make a large RRSP contribution if you have contribution room.

Here’s an example – mortgage, car loan and credit cards total $225,000. If you have enough equity, you can roll that debt into a new $233,000 mortgage, including a fee to break the existing mortgage, and look at the payoff. Read the rest of this entry »

Your credit score is more important than ever.

bad credit  What is your credit score?

Credit scores can range from 300 to 900 and are used by lenders to determine what kind of a risk you are likely to be as a borrower. Your score is based on several attributes -

Payment history

The single biggest factor in your credit score is having a timely bill payment history. Recent late payments are factored more heavily than old ones so start today and never let a bill get past due. Read the rest of this entry »

Average Toronto detached home sale is over $966k

$$ up arrow Recent housing stats released by Toronto Real Estate Board (TREB) show listings and sales are down but, prices are up.  According to TREB, the average sale price for a detached home in Toronto is $966,875.    For those that have invested in real estate, you’ve done well.  For those that are looking to buy, this may not be such good news.. However, there is a bright spot.

TREB also said that affordability has not deteriorated due to low mortgage rates.   No doubt that low rates are helping to fuel real estate price increases.   If you are waiting for the market to fall and prices to drop, you may want to reconsider that plan.   The forecast is for prices to remain strong.

It’s been an interesting year so far.  We’ve had a cold Spring, an even colder Winter, and yet the real estate market is red hot.   Watch for house sales to remain strong.   Trying to time the market can be costly.  Just ask those that sold 2, 3 and 4 years ago.   There have been many calls to exit the market.  I have personally seen some clients sell and rent for the last 2 and 3 years.  They are questioning that decision now.

I think buying a home should be a long term investment.  Plan to hold for 7 years.  That’s a long enough time to live through any up or down housing cycles.   If you can stick with that plan, then you should be okay.  Don’t buy because you are afraid of missing out.  Buy because you need a home and can afford it.  Buy because it’s a long-term investment and you have planned and thought it out.   Buying to invest is a good idea, you just need to understand what it takes to own and finance a property.

Speak with a team of professionals.  You need a good realtor, a lawyer, a mortgage broker, and an accountant.   Professional advice doesn’t mean it’s gonna cost you a lot of money either.   Professionals usually cost less than you think.. or they get compensated by other parties.. such as realtors and mortgage brokers.. you don’t pay them when you buy a house…  The get paid by the seller or the mortgage lender (unless you don’t qualify for a traditional mortgage).    The point is, it’s easier than you think.

Your best interest is my only interest.   I reply to all questions and I welcome your comments.  Like this article?  Share with a friend.

Steve Garganis 416 224 0114 steve@mortgagenow.ca

 

CMHC higher premiums start today

CMHCCMHC’s new higher insurance premiums take effect today.  That means it will cost you a little more if you are buying a home with less than 20% down.  The increases are minor and aren’t expected to have any effect on the housing market.  (by the way, CMHC has adjusted these premiums before)

What’s puzzling is why they felt the need to do this.  CMHC produces a healthy profit. As a crown corporation, those profits go directly into the government coffers.   CMHC arrears are at 0.33%.  That’s close to an all time low.

I guess it’s a good way to increase profits but they are making $2billion per year!   Here’s the old and new premiums.

Loan-to-Value Ratio Standard Premium (Current) Standard Premium (Effective May 1st, 2014)
Up to and including 65% 0.50% 0.60%
Up to and including 75% 0.65% 0.75%
Up to and including 80% 1.00% 1.25%
Up to and including 85% 1.75% 1.80%
Up to and including 90% 2.00% 2.40%
Up to and including 95% 2.75% 3.15%
90.01% to 95% – Non-Traditional Down Payment 2.90% 3.35%

Your best interest is my only interest.   I welcome your questions and comments.  Like this article?  Share it with a friend.

Steve Garganis 416 224 0114 steve@mortgagenow.ca

 

Watch “LowRateHandcuffs SteveGarganis” on YouTube

LowRateHandcuffs SteveGarganis: http://youtu.be/0PYscaojGT4

Think all mortgages are alike? Guess again.   Choosing a mortgage because it has the so-called “lowest rate” or because it’s from a major bank can cost you $$thousands.

Check out this video I call “Low Rate handcuffs”.

Not sure if your mortgage has the “Low Rate handcuffs”?  Contact me to find out and what you can do about it.

Steve Garganis
Steve@mortgagenow.ca
416-224-0114

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