Panic buying? When will the housing market slow down?

 

hot-housing-marketHouses selling over asking price is becoming the norm, these days.  Kinda crazy.  Sometimes a house is just listed under market value to attract a frenzy of buyers. An old tactic that has worked well in larger urban markets.  Today, that tactic is being used in smaller communities, too.

What’s unclear is if this selling tactic is contributing to houses selling for more than they’re worth.  And what is a home worth, anyway?   I always thought a house was worth what someone was willing to pay in the open market.  That’s still true in most cases, today.

When I see reports of houses selling for $100k, $200k and $300k over asking, it makes me wonder.  How long will this market last?  Will it crash?  And if so, when?   It’s hard to make forecasts and I can’t see into the future, but let’s examine this a little.

WHEN WILL THE HOUSING MARKET CRASH? Read the rest of this entry »

Today is your last chance to stop DOUBLING of Land Transfer Tax.

kathleen wynneAs this is such an important issue, I’m gonna repeat my last article.  Today is the last day to voice your opinion to our Provincial govt and tell them how you feel about the possibility of DOUBLING your Land Transfer Tax.     The govt is accepting all opinions until today.

The Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing is Ted McMeekin… You can email his office through Mark Cripps at  Mark.Cripps@ontario.ca and by phone at 416 585 6842.

In case you don’t know what Land Transfer Tax is… the province charges a tax to the purchaser, every time a home is sold.  Yup, another cash grab.  It’s kinda like when you buy a new car… when you buy it, you are charged sales tax (today, that’s 13%… remember when it was 7% and 8%?  seeing a pattern here anyone?).   And when you sell that car, the sales tax is levied once again to the new purchaser…when they sell it, the new purchaser must pay this sales tax again… and so on, and so on.    But why?  Why should a sales tax be charged over and over again?   Can anyone explain this?

If you buy a house, and sell in 2 or 3 or 10 yrs, the govt charges this Land Transfer Tax.  It’s ridiculous and it’s not a fair system of levying a charge..   Yet, it’s something that has been accepted as the norm.

In Toronto, the mayor couldn’t balance the budget so he seeked special powers from the Province to introduce a Toronto Land Transfer Tax in 2008.  Yup, they just created a new tax out of thin air and slammed all property buyers with a double tax..   Nice, eh?

Look, if you are as upset with this as I am, then take 2 mins and send an email to the govt.   It’s one thing to bring into a major city like Toronto, but to bring into all communities across the province would be disastrous.   Not all of Ontario is experiencing prosperity.  This is shameful.  I don’t like making strong statements like that.  But I can’t help myself.

Stand up Ontarians!  Have your say.

Your best interest is my only interest.   I reply to all questions and I welcome your comments.  Like this article?  Share with a friend.

Steve Garganis 416 224 0114 steve@mortgagenow.ca

New Land Transfer Tax for ALL of Ontario??!! Ms. Wynne, stop the madness!

kathleen wynneDid you know that in 2008, the city of Toronto was given special powers by the Provincial govt to bring their own municipal land transfer tax?   Since then, homebuyers in Toronto have had to pay 2 land transfer taxes.  The Provincial one and the municipal one.

On a $500,000 home, Land Transfer tax in Toronto is $12,200.  In the rest of Ontario, it’s $6475.  On a $750,000 home, LTT in Toronto is $22,200. The rest of Ontario, it’s $11,475.  It’s a sliding scale with the % going up the more your home is worth.

Yesterday, October 27th (remember this date), we saw news reports that the Ontario provincial  is considering extending those same special powers to the rest of Ontario.    I’ll repeat that… the Provincial govt, led by Ms. Kathleen Wynne, is considering extending special powers to allow the rest of Ontario to add their own municipal land transfer tax.  Read the rest of this entry »

Trump’s George Ross says Canada’s Housing market is undervalued….

George RossGeorge Ross is Donald Trump’s Executive VP.  He’s Trump’s senior advisor and has worked with Trump for 30 years.   You’ve probably seen him on TV on ‘The Apprentice’.   This week, he was quoted as saying Canada’s real estate market is undervalued, not overvalued.    That’s quite the opposite of what the so-called experts have been saying for 8 or 9 years.  (by the way, where are those experts now?)

If you listen to his interview, he makes some good points.   Office properties have more upward potential than residential properties.  But the residential market follows the Office or commercial market.   He also says that buying a house for a quick flip isn’t a good strategy.    It may sound good on the TV shows, but it’s a risky game to play.   Mr. Ross says more fortunes have been lost in real estate than have been made.   Read the rest of this entry »

Average Toronto detached home sale is over $966k

$$ up arrow Recent housing stats released by Toronto Real Estate Board (TREB) show listings and sales are down but, prices are up.  According to TREB, the average sale price for a detached home in Toronto is $966,875.    For those that have invested in real estate, you’ve done well.  For those that are looking to buy, this may not be such good news.. However, there is a bright spot.

TREB also said that affordability has not deteriorated due to low mortgage rates.   No doubt that low rates are helping to fuel real estate price increases.   If you are waiting for the market to fall and prices to drop, you may want to reconsider that plan.   The forecast is for prices to remain strong.

It’s been an interesting year so far.  We’ve had a cold Spring, an even colder Winter, and yet the real estate market is red hot.   Watch for house sales to remain strong.   Trying to time the market can be costly.  Just ask those that sold 2, 3 and 4 years ago.   There have been many calls to exit the market.  I have personally seen some clients sell and rent for the last 2 and 3 years.  They are questioning that decision now.

I think buying a home should be a long term investment.  Plan to hold for 7 years.  That’s a long enough time to live through any up or down housing cycles.   If you can stick with that plan, then you should be okay.  Don’t buy because you are afraid of missing out.  Buy because you need a home and can afford it.  Buy because it’s a long-term investment and you have planned and thought it out.   Buying to invest is a good idea, you just need to understand what it takes to own and finance a property.

Speak with a team of professionals.  You need a good realtor, a lawyer, a mortgage broker, and an accountant.   Professional advice doesn’t mean it’s gonna cost you a lot of money either.   Professionals usually cost less than you think.. or they get compensated by other parties.. such as realtors and mortgage brokers.. you don’t pay them when you buy a house…  The get paid by the seller or the mortgage lender (unless you don’t qualify for a traditional mortgage).    The point is, it’s easier than you think.

Your best interest is my only interest.   I reply to all questions and I welcome your comments.  Like this article?  Share with a friend.

Steve Garganis 416 224 0114 steve@mortgagenow.ca

 

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